Is MMA Good for Kids? by Calasanz

The popularity of mixed martial arts competitions, or MMA has naturally spawned an interest in children who want to pursue the sport. This has created a rising demand for MMA instruction and most parents turn to martial art schools as their first source.

Despite its popularity, there is a lot of controversy surrounding MMA for kids. The goal in an MMA match is a knockout or submission through a choke hold or limb lock, where kids have to “tap out” to signal to their partners that it’s enough. Many find the practice of teaching children how to fight so aggressively barbaric and are calling for a ban of the sport. Many parents and martial artists are horrified at sight of young children being cheered on for attacking each other and the message that this is sending to young impressionable minds. 

Unfortunately, kids have taped themselves fighting MMA style and have posted it on You Tube, just like kids have done with backyard wrestling.  Some of the kids who post their fights are beating the daylights out of each other in their living rooms or garages. In some of these videos, there is no safety gear, no adult in sight supervising their actions nor have they had adequate training.  This is a disaster waiting to happen. 

My other concern is the MMA tournaments for children.  While training in a well-structured class with a competent, safety conscious instructor is fine with me, you lose a lot of that control when your children participate in tournament competition.  You don’t know who your child is fighting against and how this child has been trained.  The reality is that there are many instructors and parents training their own kids, who teach them how to fight dirty and don’t both fostering good sportsmanlike behavior. 

While some of these tournaments are well organized and pay close attention to safety regulations, others are not and you are putting your child at risk. It will be tournaments like this that create an environment for serious injuries and may eventually force the government to step in. There is also a lot of concern, especially from the medical community that children who participate in MMA are prone to elbow, knee, wrist, ankle, neck and shoulder injuries.

The reality however is that children who participate in sports are always at risk for injuries whether they play football, baseball, basketball, ice hockey, gymnastics or even cheerleading.  Many kids also end up getting injured just by riding their bikes.  Injuries are a part of an active child’s life.  The bottom line is that if your son or daughter wants to learn MMA, you have to choose a school and an instructor who puts safety first.  So as a parent, don’t just sign up your kid at the first school that offers MMA classes.  Pay close attention to the instructor’s attitude, teaching style and attention to safety. 

ESPN and ABC’s 20/20 have both aired mainstream media investigative reports on the topic. The ABC 20/20 segment showcased Gillett’s Mixed Martial Arts Gym in Fall River, Massachusetts.  If all children who wanted to learn mixed martial arts had access to a school like this one, I would say “go for it.”  From what I observed in this segment and others featuring the same school, I found it to be a very responsible martial arts establishment.

The first thing I liked about the school is that the boys and girls in the segments wore headgear and the gloves with substantial padding. The instructors were adequately supervising the kids and actively coaching during the course of the matches. Several parents were interviewed and were very pleased with the results of the instruction.  They found their children were more disciplined, respectful and also improved in school. They also said that their kids don’t use MMA outside of the school. This is a sign of good instruction.  Interestingly, the mayor of Fall River, Robert Correia, who blasted the school, never even visited the place nor did he take the time out to talk to those involved.

Bottom line is that when any martial art, traditional or mixed, is taught by a competent instructor, a child is reaps the benefits.  Boys and girls who participate in any martial art tend to be less violent and more responsible than their counterparts.  This just doesn’t happen by accident.  Training with a qualified instructor minimizes injuries and does not teach violence. So if your child wants to train in MMA, take the time to find a good school.

Calasanz Martial Arts and Fitness

1-203-847-6528

507 Westport Ave, Norwalk CT 06851

www.calasanz.com

www.interdojo.com

www.the-perfectfit.com

www.westportboxing.com

www.norwalkboxing.com

Calasanz on the birth and development of his system.

The birth of my system I must say coincides with my very birth. From the day I was born I’ve known the natural workings of the human body. How it works, how to optimize. Even when I was a child in karate class, I would hide my movements from my instructor because I didn’t want to get in trouble.

Throughout my years I’ve learned to apply the knowledge I was born with regarding the functional movements of the body to real fighting situations and have also developed it into a physical system for naturally improving the body. The system is called Physical Arts. It utilizes natural holistic movements and is aimed at the long term development and maintenance of the human body over a lifetime.

This is not a “get ripped” program. It is not a superficial body building regimen. It is Physical Arts. It is making your body into a walking masterpiece. Welcome to Calasanz Physical Arts.

Over my lifetime I have spent every day dedicated to martial arts. Somehow I knew from the time I was a child that this was my calling. The first martial arts school I attended was a Karate School. Upon visiting this school I noticed that there were a lot of punches landing between the two contenders, too many. For me fighting is not trading blows and determining the winner by who has the best physique. A real fighter will defend against an attack and then try to connect with the target. While the karate approach may be a good way to condition the body to take a punch, it is not real fighting.

Real fighting is common sense.

First, be aware that your body performs best when it is in perfect working order. To have a broken arm in a fight is a great disadvantage when fighting a two armed man. Protecting the physical body is of primary importance in a fight. It is essential and foundational. Your body being in perfect working order gives you the best chance of survival. This is achieved by blocking or evading successfully. Essentially, a good defense is imperative.

The next element of real fighting is to be able to disable or eliminate the threat to your physical body as quickly as possible. This is achieved through Wing Chun. The body that remains fully functional for longer and acts most efficiently and effectively is bound to prevail.

Now we come to size. Size is something a lot of people deem to be a good judge of strength and even fighting ability. Often times people will fear an opponent due to sheer size. Let us consider now, two rifles aimed towards two watermelons. Place in front of one, 10 inches of marshmallows. Place in front of the other 1 inch of steel. Which watermelon would you stand behind if the triggers were flicked? Size doesn’t seem to matter much now. While it should be taken into consideration, it is not always of great importance, and this is no different when it comes to fighting. Similarly the size of the man matters not, but it is his mettle, his character, what he is actually capable of that holds greater bearing.

It has been proven again and again in the real world, as well as in boxing, and other martial sports. Frequently a larger opponent with an incredible physique is set against a smaller man who’s physique is comparatively lacking. While the larger man seems more formidable, this is merely in appearance. It has been seen repeatedly that a contender inferior in stature can easily be victorious with superior technique. A phenomenal physique can only give someone an advantage up to a point. If technique is lacking and a contender’s offense is unwieldy, it is easy for a proficient fighter to penetrate and take advantage of an opponents untrained flailing, capitalize on exposed vulnerabilities, and dismantle his opponent. It is important to realize that just because you have the biggest body it does not mean that you are capable of functionally using that body to be effective in a fight.

Street fighters, for example, believe they are good fighters based on the fact that they are aggressive and willing to fight. However, when a street fighter squares off with someone who is a trained and an accomplished practitioner of the art it is clear within seconds that their overly aggressive approach does not work. I experienced this first hand in the early 80’s when street fighters would challenge me and my students constantly. No doubt in an attempt to debunk me personally and the system I have come to develop. In time I would place a sign on the door welcoming challengers. I remember two gentlemen distinctly, Jay and Kenny.

I met these two gentlemen in Norwalk in 1987 after attending the same gym for a time called George’s Gym. Jay, at this point, was considered the biggest body builder in CT. He also did not like me very much when I started going to that gym and everybody wondered how long I would stay there given his disposition. Kenny, now, was known at this time as the “Terror of Norwalk”. Everybody knew him either from getting in trouble or simply knowing of his preceding reputation of beating young guys. George’s Gym at this time had, without a doubt, some of the toughest street fighters coming through there, not to mention some volatile body builders as well. I remember telling somebody, “I need one week here before everybody is training under me.” And it was just exactly that which ended up happening. After demonstrating to Jay my power, speed, endurance, and grounding, based purely on martial arts skill, Jay signed with me immediately for a month of private training. I remember, also, Jay being at the gym pressing 1500 to 2000 pounds with his legs using a machine.

One day I put Jay to the test and asked him to pick up his leg and push against my stomach. Jay could not even do so much as make me budge, and in less than a second I was showing Jay a new way under my system. There was a difference of understanding between our two mindsets. In his mind, and in that of much of the Western world, to push iron and pack muscle onto his frame was the ideal. This is achieved through monotonous movement and mechanical repetition creating tight, inflexible muscle.

In my mind natural, flexible, long muscle built through physical art is what brings the ideal into fruition. This is achieved through exercising motions that naturally accommodate the anatomy of the human body and develop real strength by engaging the entire body as a whole. Synchronizing breath and motion into pure, fluid, natural, transformative moments of life itself. To this day he remains a faithful convert.

Kenny, on the other hand is a bit of a different story. He is 6′ 5″ and always made his mark on his opponents. As we continued to spend time in the same building his frustration with me continued to fester and grow. He eventually took the liberty to invite every member of the gym to come and see how easily he would defeat me. The terror of Norwalk once more coming against an opponent to validate his status in front of everyone; his ego eager for all to gather and see for its own satisfaction. Only this time he did not know who he was up against, me, Calasanz.

On that day, the fight was over almost as soon as it began. We touched fists, and from that moment sympathy ceased to exist. The fight, it had to be stopped in less than 10 seconds after a single blow. I had placed the heal of my foot into Kenny’s hips, and after taking the shot Kenny’s gait was knocked off its axis and he would not walk properly for a time afterwards. The kick was powerful enough to nearly dislocate Kenny’s hips and caused stop to his offense immediately. I can’t remember if he ever came back.

After that day I ended up training many of these street fighters, and I trained them for free. Over time they would go to competitions and compete in my stead. Within three years the name Calasanz was recognized all over the United States and even internationally. Fighters under my system were making significant impressions every where they went spreading the name, Calasanz. One competition in particular stands out in my mind, one involving KYOKUSHINKAI where two of my students won. Each of them competing within their own brackets and finishing on top.

Looking closer now at the KYOKUSHINKAI practice itself, it is a brutal form of martial arts popularized in the 1980’s. When competing, full force kicks are thrown towards opponents’ heads or anywhere else for that matter and no protective gear is used. Punches are allowed but are only directed towards the chest. Often times in a KYOKUSHINKAI tournament there will be a great number of knock downs and knock outs from head kicks. The kick being the most powerful weapon an unarmed fighter possesses, you can imagine the danger in combating someone trained in this practice. My students competed with full confidence and continued to win the tournament in their respective brackets.

Again, keep in mind that at this time KYOKOSHINKAI was a very popular martial art with a multitude of dedicated practitioners making it vital for a competitor to practice as more than just a hobby. In such brutal competition one must really have their wits about them else he may get knocked out, or even killed, very quickly. My students showed their talents. Both of them victorious under my coaching and Physical Arts Body Development system.

Calasanz Martial Arts and Fitness

1-203-847-6528

507 Westport Ave, Norwalk CT 06851

www.calasanz.com

www.interdojo.com

www.the-perfectfit.com

www.westportboxing.com

www.norwalkboxinggyms.com

The First System to Implement ‘Items’

For so many years I wanted to have a system that could be so simple that students would not have problems challenging themselves at anytime, especially if they did not maintain a previous active lifestyle. I maintained students for years and showed them different styles of martial arts on top of what they were here studying, this way, after they earned their black belt; they already had the knowledge to build on those skills. I was not interested in belt rank, and I wanted to keep students involved at all times, but when they took a break and got out of shape, they lost most of their technique. Instead of being able to pick up an additional certification on top of their black belt, it would take many lessons since they stopped training. Had they continued their regimen, it may have only taken two lessons.

For example, one student said, “Calasanz, I have not been there and I want to take two weeks to get back in shape.” Since this student already had a black belt, I wanted to get specific with his training and get him some certifications on top of his black belt, which we call “Items” under the Calasanz System. My suggestion for his training was two weeks of mixed martial arts, certification in either American or recreational boxing, and part one of a Kata, which is great for getting in shape. I would have loved for him  to take part one in Wing Chun but it is too slow and takes longer to get in shape unless you take part one of Chinese boxing.  I told him to let me know what he prefers since there are around 700 hundred basic items, with sub-items exceeding 4000.

Before I give you another example, I have to mention Kyle. He is eight years old and is very happy to be a black belt. Once in a while, Jeff or I will ask him, “What about the next certification?” He just says, “Of course, my parents and I are all for it.” Kyle has the legs chi sau certification, and he just got the first part of Wing Chun certification. Being so young, it is exciting for him, but also it is cute to see how happy he is and how effective this program is.

Another student is a U.S. Marine named Erik, who was the first student to get 17 certifications along with his black belt. During the course for over two years, he has become one of the best qualified instructors from my school and he is getting ready to open a school in Florida which will be based on private one-on-one personal training.  He is also qualified to speak and demonstrate in a martial arts seminar.

An important item we offer is boxing, both traditional American boxing and recreational boxing. Traditional American boxing is what you are accustomed to seeing on television but recreational boxing is something you would take up without having to become a competitor. Recreational boxing will make you faster, stronger, and more flexible, grounded, balanced, to get in better physical condition, and will give you the best self defense. It only takes Calasanz a half hour to give you enough self defense, to enable you in becoming capable of surviving on the street against any opponent. You could experience a thug throwing punches at you and by closing the gap, you will not get hit and you can counter at any time. The reason why is simple: the guy on the street is not a boxer and if he was a boxer, he may not have attacked you in the first place. Recreational boxing makes it easier for you to take care of yourself without getting hit and makes it easier to hurt the attacker.

Make sure you understand that if you take a half hour of boxing to learn how to defend yourself, if there is no power in your arsenal, you have not gotten the point of the exercises and that is why we also give  you the responsibility to learn these exercises so you can practice them at home. Real defense means you are empowered to take care of yourself, your grounding, and your balance. These are the main tools you need in order to be successful on the street.

In boxing, there are a few techniques but it can take you many years to master them. It is similar to Wing Chun, there are few blocks, a few kicks and punches, but it requires talent, intelligence and a lot of work in order to be able to master that art.

Since I went to my first karate school, I already understood this and I did not believe in rank. I remember seeing all these ranks on a black belt, but I also remember going to one class and not coming back for about three months, and being able to develop on my own during that time. Still, I was not completely sure where I was in the martial arts. All I knew was that I understood something that they did not. During that first class, all I witnessed and experienced was brutality and I knew “martial arts” was much more than that!

Calasanz Martial Arts and Fitness

507 Westport Ave,NorwalkCT06851

1.800.414.9544

www.calasanz.com

www.interdojo.com

www.the-perfectfit.com

www.westportboxing.com

Single Blow and Street Survivor: Martial Art Courses for the Real World

Most martial artists will tell you that your chances of surviving abduction once an attacker gets you into his car are slim to none.  Their advice is to fight for your life because statistics show that the consequences are grim.  On Wednesday, July 28, 2004, Larissa del Mar Fiallo, was assaulted by two men who tried to kidnap her in the parking lot of a shopping mall.  The incident made international news because Ms. Fiallo is this year’s Miss Dominican Republic.  What interested us about the story reported by CNN.com (July 29, 2004) was that Ms. Fiallo was able to escape her attackers “thanks to her knowledge of judo.”  She explained how she fought back when the two men tried to get her into their car and how she knocked over the larger one three times.  Her attackers fled the scene and an investigation is pending. While Ms. Fiallo suffered deep cuts and bruises to various parts of her body, she survived the attack and was released from the hospital several days later.

Violent crime is on the rise in the Dominican Republica as the country faces one of the “worst economic crises in decades, according to CNN.com.  Calasanz was born and raised in this country where he learned about self-defense first hand.  His experience did not come from pre-arranged tournaments with competitors wearing padding and subjecting themselves to the rules and regulations of sparring.  He learned hand-to-hand combat in an environment where a man is routinely challenged to physically defend him and others.

Calasanz has combined his real life experience and martial arts training into two courses designed to serve the needs of a public interested in fitness and self-defense.  “While we teach traditional martial arts as part of our curriculum, if people request it, most want to get into shape and learn how to fight,” says Calasanz.  “They don’t want to spend years learning forms or weapons that were used in ancient societies. And they could care less about belts and stripes.”  Most of the students who train at Calasanz are busy executives, professionals and homemakers who want a curriculum that emphasizes fitness and self-defense.  “Many of my students travel for business and are concerned with their safety in an increasingly uncertain world.  They want to be prepared to defend themselves and their loved ones.”

The essence of the Single Blow and Street Survivor Courses is to strike where an attacker is most vulnerable and to get away.   Single Blow is our basic course designed for those who wish to learn a simple, effective form of self-defense in a short period of time.  Street Survivor is a more complex version of Single Blow, which includes more techniques and technical training.  The one feature that both courses have in common is Calasanz’ Body Conditioning System.  A defensive blow is useless unless the person delivering it is able to focus his or her power.  Calasanz has always believed that the study of self-defense begins with making a connection to your physical body and learning how to use it as a weapon.  It is from there that Calasanz and his trained instructors teach you his unique philosophy of counterattacks and how to use them in any situation. 

We at Calasanz wish Ms. Fiallo a speedy recovery and commend her for her bravery in the face of extreme danger.  She serves as an example to all of us of why we study the martial arts. For those interested in either the Single Blow or Street Survivor Course, contact the school for a personal consultation. 

Calasanz Martial Arts and Fitness

507 Westport Ave,Norwalk CT06851

www.calasanz.com

www.interdojo.com

www.the-perfectfit.com

www.westportboxing.com

WHAT IS NATURAL POWER? by Calasanz

Calasanz was about nine years old when he noticed a man insulting a lady. That man was around 22 years old, tall, and physically fit. Even at a young age, Calasanz defended the lady. If no one intervened, the fight may have ended badly for the man. I trapped this man’s head on a fence covered with barbed wire and I was choking him. I was a strong kid and thankfully for that guy, someone broke up the fight.

I was loved and famous since I was two years old with most of my fame coming from dancing, singing, and working harder than anyone else on the farm. At the age of seven I was milking 20 cows. On top of being so strong, I had high energy and my parents could not control me. One particular fight was against a young man named Alvarado who was insulting my cousin Jose.  Jose was not fighting back, so I jumped to his defense. Alvarado was older and twice my size and normally would have helped defend me did not have to interfere because I was kicking Alvarado so hard that all he could do was try to survive. This fight even became popular among the neighbors and was talked about for quite some time. I kicked like a mule in that fight. What I did to Alvarado back then was karate. I was able to teach my five year old brother how to counter attack. My brother got into a fight one day and applied what I taught him and at one point punched a kid so hard that he was down for almost three minutes. There were some bad kids around; we were the well behaved, educated kids, who did not take abuse from anyone.

Now I can reflect back to when I played softball. I was young, responsible, popular, and I worked at a bank. The bank had a softball league, so they convinced me to play, knowing that as a kid, I was a very good player.  Even though at this point in life, I was dedicated to martial arts and stopped playing other sports like baseball and softball. I decided to play the season and we won the championship. I gained popularity by hitting the ball so hard. All the players would laugh at me when I stepped up to the plate but I always turned those laughs around by getting hit after hit. During one of the games, a teammate and police officer named Brian, who was as big as a football player, and me weighing 120 pounds, both went to catch a fly ball. Second before Brian crashed into me, he screamed and said, “Look who I am crashing into today.” Brian ended up getting the worst of the collision and almost cried.  I was 16 years old and just 120 pounds.

Calasanz Martial Arts and Fitness

507 Westport Ave.Norwalk,CT06851

1-800-414-9544

www.calasanz.com

www.interdojo.com

www.the-perfectfit.com

www.westportboxing.com

Teaching the Calasanz System – Part Three: A Lifetime of Lessons – Calasanz Extended Biography

 

Continued from: “Teaching the Calasanz System – Part Two: A Lifetime of Lessons – Calasanz Extended Biography”

Many of our messages have been directed at students who are very good fighters.  One of the messages I have to give over and over is that you don’t have to brutalize yourself in order to become a good fighter.  I don’t believe in this type of training.  I think that an effective fighter has to train “smarter.”  Sending a message or teaching a lesson to a student does not require that you physically injure them.  I’ve never had to physically injure a student in order to get my point across.  Why?  You train in the martial arts to be able to defend yourself.  Survival is not dependant on knowing thousands of techniques, but rather on your balance, grounding, power and most of all, heart.  Courage and intelligence will go farther in self-defense.  This is the key to surviving a life-threatening situation.  This is the philosophy behind many of my messages to my students.

I have taught many high rank students from other system, some of them have been very talented martial artists.  I enjoy teaching students from other systems because they bring their own special talents.  The one thing that does frustrate me sometimes is getting them to make the transition from their style to the Calasanz System.  I have designed this system to be practical.  With that in mind, I have done away with the tradition of teaching hundreds of techniques and forms.  Unfortunately, many students are more interested in quantity, not quality.  They haven’t even practiced a front kick to the point they can deliver effectively and they are asking, “What am I going to learn next?”  My philosophy is learning a few things, learn them well and make them as automatic as possible.  When you are confronted with a life-threatening situation, I promise that a lot of those fancy techniques will go right out the window.  In addition, an attacker on the streets is not going to engage in polite cooperation.  He’s not going to let you take your time while you respond to a wrist grab.

I have created a course called Street Survivor that teaches simple defensive techniques.  I can teach you some effective fighting skills within a relatively short period of time.  I once had a man training with me who was hired as a bodyguard for a well-known politician.  He was required to train as part of his job, so he was sent to me.  While he didn’t understand the difference between the different styles of martial arts, he understood the basic techniques I taught him, especially, heavy leg training and kicking.  I programmed him to counter attack with great ferocity.  One day, I put him to spar with a Thai boxer from Cambodia.  Regardless of the attack this Thai boxer delivered, this man was able to counter attack and hold his own.  I finally had to stop the fight because the Thai boxer had taken a couple of heavy kicks to the leg and I was afraid that any more kicks could lead to an injury.  The Thai boxer was humiliated and couldn’t eat for two days.  This sent a clear message to him.  He came to my school with the attitude that he knew it all and that he wasn’t going to learn anything from anyone.  I told him after this fight that he really needed to stop being so arrogant and try to learn something so that he could be as effective as the bodyguard.  I purposely gave two messages that day; one to the bodyguard and the other to the Thai boxer.  A message is more effective than giving a lecture to a student.

I sent a similar message to two other students who had come from another system.  They had a lot of techniques, so I decided to put them to spar with a student of mine who at first glance looked heavy and out of shape.  They were both hurt by this guy.  They couldn’t believe it!  This was done with training simple techniques and making counter attacks automatic.  This is what we create at Calasanz.

 To be continued…

Calasanz Martial Arts and Fitness

507 Westport Ave. Norwalk, CT 06851

www.calasanz.com

www.interdojo.com

www.the-perfectfit.com

Martial Arts American Style – Part Four: A Lifetime of Lessons – Calasanz Extended Biography

Continued from “: Martial Arts American Style – Part three: A Lifetime of Lessons – Calasanz Extended Biography”

My training in different schools, both here and in the Dominican Republic, has taught me that a martial artist with true skill doesn’t have to fight.  He can win respect by his skill and confidence.  If you have skill and confidence, you don’t have to lift a finger.  Let your training speak for itself.  I had another experience in that same Darien school.  I had another classmate who I sincerely believe could have beat me if we fought prior to my intensive kicking training.  I was able to take on anyone in the class in a full contact challenge now that my legs were super strong and fast.  I have to admit however that I would probably lose at point or Olympic fighting, which is a very common form of sparring in most martial arts schools.  I was used to full contact fighting, so fighting for points made no sense to me.  While I have great respect for those who train hard to engage in point fighting only because I admire their dedication to training, I sometimes think that they are lulled into a false sense that they can really fight full contact. 

An aikido practitioner came to class and challenged me to a fight because he heard that I was very strong.  He was much bigger than I was, but that didn’t bother me.  I grabbed him and he wasn’t able to move my hands.  I executing a takedown and sent him crashing to the floor.  I had him pinned to the ground and he called the head master of the school, a very talented martial artist.  The teacher told him how to get out of it by going with my power instead of going against it.  I was very impressed with his answer, but I was angry at this guy for calling the teacher over in the first place. 

When I worked as a bartender there was a tall, strong customer who was curious to see how strong I really was.  I politely turned him down, but everyone kept encouraging me to do something.  One day, the bar was full.  He started challenging me again, so I gave in.  He grabbed me and I have to admit, he was pretty strong.  I could barely move my wrist.  I took a deep breath and was able to twist his wrist so hard that everyone in the room heard a “crack.”  I ended up breaking his thumb and he had to spend four weeks in a cast.  I felt really bad about it, but he just wouldn’t let up.

I eventually got very tired of working in a restaurant.  There were a lot of rude, nasty customers to deal with.  I remember this one guy who was treating me like dirt while I was waiting on him.  He left me a tip that was so paltry it was insulting.  I was so insulted I followed him into the parking lot and stuck his tip into his mouth.  This was a nightmare for my employer, since this guy was a big shot who later complained to the headquarters.  Surprisingly enough, I was not fired from my job.  My general manager told the headquarters that he didn’t want to fire me because I was too profitable to the restaurant.  In retrospect, I know that I over reacted.  I just got so frustrated.  It was also a message to me that maybe it was time to move on.  I had been getting increasingly frustrated with the customers.  I knew that it was time for a change.  One of my friends encouraged me to open my own school.

To be continued…

Calasanz Martial Arts and Fitness

507 Westport Ave. Norwalk, CT 06851

www.calasanz.com

www.interdojo.com

www.the-perfectfit.com

Respecting the Roots of Traditional Martial Arts

Youtuber Comment:

I have been an instructor for 26 years, my family has a long history in the martial arts. My highest rank is in Goju and Kung fu. My katas have been getting high reviews. In our motto we believe the answers are on the floor. I done many katas and there are different variations. So you can see the idea of what they look like. Now I have heard that Calasanz beat the hell out of Morio Higaonna, that’s what someone is telling me.

Response:

Thanks for your comment.  Calasanz respects the roots of Goju Ryu and credits it as well as other styles as the foundational arts for his System.  References to Goju Ryu or any other style are historical in nature.  Calasanz has created a name by giving constructive lessons to those who damage the martial arts. All of these lessons were done using non-violent diversionary techniques. Here you’re seeing a small piece of Calasanz training regime and martial art expertise.  He has spent his entire lifetime striving to be a well balanced martial artist. In addition to the traditional martial arts, he has also incorporated aerobics and dance into his training.  While some martial artists would shy away from this type of training, Calasanz sees the benefits of rounding out a rugged training regime with disciplines that focus on balance, grace and fluidity.  There are a variety of videos on this site showing the different sides of his training so just viewing one or two of them doesn’t really give you a sense of the wide range of his training. His success lies in his ability to incorporate these various disciplines into a complex system that seems simple at first glance. Thanks again and best of luck to you

Calasanz Martial Arts and Fitness Training images and videos!

Developing self-control as a martial artist

Developing self-control for a martial artist is essential for many reasons.  First, Calasanz trained many fighters who competed in point and semi-contact tournaments.  If you have no self-control, you will get disqualified and the fight goes to your opponent.  Secondly, a martial artist who lacks self-control in a fight will be judged harshly in a court of law for using “excessive force.” You have to know when to stop and when enough is enough.  Lastly, over the years, Calasanz has had a number of people stop by the school to “challenge” either Calasanz or one of his students.  His philosophy is to teach the intruder a lesson without beating the daylights out of him…just enough to get his point across. Calasanz demonstrates amazing self-control and is not just doing it for the purpose of “showing off.” All Calasanz students have faith in his technique and the fact that he’s never hit anyone by accident when demonstrating. An experienced martial artist without self-control however is a scary thing.  

Calasanz Personal Training images and videos!

Train Like A Competitor Without Competing

It takes a special person to be a competitor – Less then 1% of 1% of the population has the ability.  But the good news is that the rest of the world can train like these competitors, without the brutality and gain all the benefits that come along with it.

Train Like a Fighter Without Fighting